Something new (hopefully)   11 comments

Just been playing around with a new puzzle concept, so I’m looking for feedback from you kind solvers.

Please forgive the rubbishy Cryptale name; it’s just a working title. What we have here is a 6×6 barred grid and a slightly unusual way of presenting the clues, my motivation being to create a reasonably challenging crossword with a minimum pagespace impact. I’ve avoided the sorts of obscurities typically associated with barred puzzles, so don’t worry about the vocab. Here it is – please do let me have your thoughts: http://crossword.info/anaxcrosswords/CRYPTALE01

SOLUTION (pdf): Cryptale solution with clue notes.

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Posted March 24, 2011 by Anax in Crosswords to solve

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11 responses to “Something new (hopefully)

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  1. hmm.. you will have to tell me how to get started. It looks a little indigestible to me

  2. Hi Jerry
    I suppose the first tip will be to try to identify the first/last clues in each of the two sets – effectively you’ll be working your way inwards from both ends.

  3. It is quite tricky to get the hang of the way clues overlap. In the end I am not sure I would want to try any more of these novel puzzles.

  4. Solved it, it’s tricky to do on line! I unwittingly did it the way you suggest, even if I don’t fully understand 3d. The usual Anax misleads I’m pleased to see. 6a is quite an amazing clue.
    Seems a nice little concept to me.

  5. I agree with John – clues tricky to parse, but quite obviously gets easier once a couple in each ‘long clue’ gets identified.

    It reminds me of a grade A or B Magpie puzzle from some years ago (possibly by Brimstone, although my memory of the setter could be way off target) where a full size barred puzzle was clues as one long story, with no answer lengths given at all.

    As a half hour diversion, this was pretty entertaining, but I’m unsure as to where you’d find a home to publish these.

  6. Enjoyed this! I got 11A and 2D quickly and the down clues got sorted out soon. 9A was the last to fall since the word was unfamiliar. The checking in a barred grid is very helpful!

    It must have been an interesting exercise for you too Anax – clues like the clever 6A wouldn’t find place in a regular cryptic.

    @flashling: I read 3D as a double definition with the word in the middle as a link word.

  7. Couldn’t get my head round this one. Maybe if I could see the solution I might understand.

  8. Interesting diversion. It is the first barred grid puzzle I ever attempted – only beacause Anax said the vocab is par for the course. It did turn out to be – and I enjoyed the little bit of torture. The 2 or 3 that I had trouble with and could not parse the wordplay effectively (Goddess and very clues though I could solve them from crossings and definition) are probably because of how one is used to seeing clues that are almost self sufficient sentences. Think it is an interesting puzzle type that I would like to try say once a week or so especially if it is restricted to a 6×6 grid – beyond that, it is definitely beyond my ability. Well done and thanks for sharing it, anax.

  9. I seem to remember a Mr Magoo puzzle in the Magpie about 4 or 5 years ago that consisted of a short story to do with moving in to a new flat. Well beyond my solving ability at the time. Probably still well beyond my solving ability!

    I’d like to see this one kicking out one of the usual three Sudokus that appear in every paper every day, even if only at weekends.

    • Hi Andy
      That’s the hope – ultimately this puzzle could take up some of the space currently used by sudokus. Financially a puzzle like this would be up against it; sudokus are generated at the click of a button and are free, which is why they’re so popular with puzzle page editors. Never mind the quality, save the pennies.
      At some point I’m hoping editors will see that offering unique puzzles will attract more solvers = more newspaper sales.
      There always will (and should be) space for sudoku, but not in the number we currently see. It’s a one-dimensional solving experience, so why have 3 or 4 puzzles per page?

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